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Travel To Karnataka

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    Taste Of IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Sikandra, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri,Amer, Jaipur, Samode ... Taste of India is literally a sampling of the cultural history of a varied region which encompasses splendid Hindu, Mughal and Colonial architectural sights. The destinations encompassed in this itinerary are: Delhi - The eternal capital of India  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    415 €

     

    The Golden TriangleNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

    Ganges: The Classical Tours of North IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

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    Taste Of IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Sikandra, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri,Amer, Jaipur, Samode ... Taste of India is literally a sampling of the cultural history of a varied region which encompasses splendid Hindu, Mughal and Colonial architectural sights. The destinations encompassed in this itinerary are: Delhi - The eternal capital of India  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    415 €

     

    The Golden TriangleNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

    Ganges: The Classical Tours of North IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

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    Taste Of IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Sikandra, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri,Amer, Jaipur, Samode ... Taste of India is literally a sampling of the cultural history of a varied region which encompasses splendid Hindu, Mughal and Colonial architectural sights. The destinations encompassed in this itinerary are: Delhi - The eternal capital of India  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    415 €

     

    The Golden TriangleNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

    Ganges: The Classical Tours of North IndiaNorth IndiaVisiting: Delhi, Jaipur, Amer, Fatehpur Sikri,Agra, Sikandra ... The Golden Triangle, as it is called, is the most popular tour of India. It is also one of the most popular tourist circuit in the world. Starting with New Delhi, the Capital of India which was laid down with broad avenues and plush green gardens  ...  View itinerary

    8 Days Onwards

    455 €

     

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Profile

 Karnataka is a tapestry of colours, cultures, flavours, landscapes, timelessness and heart stopping beauty. It’s a place where vibrant worlds seamlessly meld into one another every few hundred kilometers. Sedate plains suddenly rise to dizzying mist covered hilly heights, and then plunge with careless abandon in a white-watered freefall to become languid rivers that flow past cities where time has stopped altogether. And cities where time rushes a relentless rush to keep up with the world; cities that sometimes escape into the deep quietude of thick forests and sometimes, stretches their arms wide open to embrace the sea. Host to some of India's largest and most powerful dynasties, the state has across the centuries, carried a legacy of art and culture. Its geography - making it, by all means, a 191,791 square kilometre trail of whimsy.

 

  • GEOGRAPHY ...

    Location  Jammu and Kashmir is a state in northern India. It is located mostly in the Himalayan mountains. The state has special autonomy under Article 370 of the Constitution of India.

    Geographic Coordinates  (Srinagar): 33.45°N 76.24°E.

    Indian Standard Time GMT + 05:30

    Area  222,236 sq. km

    Telephone Country Code +91

    Border States/ Countries Jammu and Kashmir has an international border with China in the north and east, and the Line of Control separates it from the Pakistani-controlled territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit–Baltistan in the west and northwest respectively.

    Border States Shares a border with the states of Himachal Pradesh and Punjab to the south.

    Climate The climate of Jammu and Kashmir varies greatly owing to its rugged topography. In the south around Jammu, the climate is typically monsoonal, though the region is sufficiently far west to average 40 to 50 mm (1.6 to 2 inches) of rain per month between January and March. In the hot season, Jammu city is very hot and can reach up to 40 °C (104 °F) whilst in July and August, very heavy though erratic rainfall occurs with monthly extremes of up to 650 millimetres (25.5 inches). In September, rainfall declines, and by October conditions are hot but extremely dry, with minimal rainfall and temperatures of around 29 °C (84 °F).

    Natural Hazards Earthquakes, floods, landslides, avalanches, high velocity winds, snow storms, besides manmade disasters including road accidents and fires etc.

    Environment - Current Issues Air pollution control, energy conservation, solid waste management, forest conservation, etc.

    Environment - International Agreements  Various services has been introduced by the Focal Point. ENVIS due to its comprehensive network has been designed as the National Focal Point (NFP) for INFOTERRA, a global environmental information network of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). In order to strengthen the information activities of the NFP, ENVIS was designated as the Regional Service Centre (RSC) of INFOTERRA of UNEP in 1985 for the South Asia Sub-Region countries.

    Geography - Note Jammu and Kashmir's wide range of elevations, its biogeography is diverse. Northwestern thorn scrub forests and Himalayan subtropical pine forests are found in the low elevations of the far southwest. These give way to a broad band of western Himalayan broadleaf forests running from northwest-southeast across the Kashmir Valley. Rising into the mountains, the broadleaf forests grade into western Himalayan subalpine conifer forests. Above the tree line are found northwestern Himalayan alpine shrub and meadows. Much of the northeast of the state is covered by the Karakoram-West Tibetan Plateau alpine steppe. Around the highest elevations, there is no vegetation, simply rock and ice.

     

  • PEOPLE ...

    • Population  India's population, as on 1 March 2011 stood at 12,541,302 (6,640,662 males and 5,900,662 females).
    • Population Growth Rate The average annual exponential growth rate stands at 23.64 per cent during 2001-2011.
    • Birth Rate The Crude Birth Rate ( SRS 2013)  was 17.5 .
    • Death Rate The Crude Death Rate ( SRS 2013) was  5.3.
    • Life Expectancy Rate 65.8 years (Males); 68.1 years (Females) in the period 2006-2011.
    • Sex Ratio 940 females per 1000 males according to 2011 census
    • Nationality Indian
    • Ethnic Groups All the five major racial types - Australoid, Mongoloid, Europoid, Caucasian, and Negroid find representation among the people of India.
    • Religions  According to the 2001 census, out of the total population of 1,028 million in the Country, Hindus constituted the majority with 80.5%, Muslims came second at 13.4%, followed by Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, and others.
    • Languages  There are 22 different languages that have been recognised by the Constitution of India, of which Hindi is an Official Language. Article 343(3) empowered Parliament to provide by law for continued use of English for official purposes.
    • Literacy According to the provisional results of the 2011 census, the literacy rate in the Country stands at 74.04 per cent, 82.14% for males and 65.46% for females.
  • GOVERNMENT ...

    Country Name Republic of India; Bharat Ganrajya

    Government Type Sovereign Socialist Secular Democratic Republic with a Parliamentary system of Government.

    Capital New Delhi

    Administrative Divisions 29 States and 7 Union Territories.

    Independence  15th August 1947 (From the British Colonial Rule)

    Constitution  The Constitution of India came into force on 26th January 1950.

    Legal System The Constitution of India is the fountain source of the legal system in the Country.

    Executive Branch The President of India is the Head of the State, while the Prime Minister is the Head of the Government, and runs office with the support of the Council of Ministers who form the Cabinet Ministry.

    Legislative Branch The Indian Legislature comprises of the Lok Sabha (House of the People) and the Rajya Sabha (Council of States) forming both the Houses of the Parliament.

    Judicial Branch The Supreme Court of India is the apex body of the Indian legal system, followed by other High Courts and subordinate Courts.

    Flag Description  The National Flag is a horizontal tricolour of deep saffron (kesaria) at the top, white in the middle, and dark green at the bottom in equal proportion. At the centre of the white band is a navy blue wheel, which is a representation of the Ashoka Chakra at Sarnath.

    National Days 26th January (Republic Day)

    15th August (Independence Day)

    2nd October (Gandhi Jayanti; Mahatma Gandhi's Birthday)

  • HISTORY ...

     

  • PEOPLE & CULTURE ...

     

  • ART FORMS ...

     

  • FESTIVALS ...

    Karnataka's millennia-long tryst with royalty has left an indelible mark on its celebrations. There's nothing understated about the way Karnataka celebrates. Revelry that's complete in every way, with dance, music, great food and a riot of colours is a tradition here. From remembering the glorious past with art, music and poetry like the Hampi Festival does to frenzied bovine energy amidst muddy fields of the Kambala buffalo races - the spectrum is quite wide.

     

    The festival of Dasara has the entire city of Mysore in raptures, while the scion of the royal family, once again dons his purple robes to pay a centuries-old extravagant homage to the guardian goddess. The many harvest festivals celebrated in various parts of the state are commemorated in ways that they deem befitting - from making an offering of groundnuts to the resident deity to firing a single shot to summon a god to making sugar idols - there's never a want for ceremony in these parts. And then you have the ceremony to end all ceremonies - the once-in-twelve-years larger than life religious ceremony of the Maha Mastakabhisheka has a 52-foot statue of Bahubali is bathed in milk, sandalwood, vermillion, curd and what not. The festivals here are definitely the stuff of spectacular.

     

    Dasara

    Mysore (September / October)

     

    Mysore Dasara is a Royal Festival Celebrating victory of Truth over Evil. Legend has it that the Goddess Chamundeeswari or Durga slew the demon Mahishasuran on Vijayadashami day.

     

    Dasara is a 10-day festival in the region culminating on Vijayadashami or tenth day. The day marks the successful conclusion of the preceding nine days. Vijayadashami is also a day of victory of the King and his subjects, be it in a battle or day-to-day governance. The preceding nine days of Navarathri have celebrations starting only after six days. The sixth day is in honour of goddess Saraswathi. Eight day is dedicated to Durga and Ninth day is for Lakshmi, goddess of wealth. On tenth day a grand spectacular Procession is held which starts from Mysore Palace and ends in Bannimantap.

     

     During Dasara, the entire City is gaily decorated and illuminated. The Palace and other important buildings are illuminated. Cultural programmes by famous artists are arranged in the Palace along with Sports, Wrestling, Poet's meet, Food Festival, Film Festival witnessed by a large number of people. Dasara Exhibition is arranged in the Doddakere Maidana, by the Karnataka Exhibition Authority, where the public and private sector industries, leading business establishments, Government departments put up their stalls to promote industrial and corporate business for months.

     

    Tula Sankramana (Kaveri Sankramana)

    Coorg (October)

     

    Tula Sankramana festival normally takes place in mid-October and is one of the prominent and sacred festivals of the Coorgs. Tula Sankramana is celebrated at Talakaveri the birth place of river Kaveri. On Tula Sankramana day a fountain from a small tank fills the holy tank at Talakaveri. People from all over the state gather at this place to dip in this holy water or Theertha. The Theertha is collected in bottles and reaches every home throughout Coorg. This Theertha is preserved in all Kodava homes. A spoonful of this water is fed to the dying, in the belief that they will attain moksha and gain entry to heaven.

     

    Hampi Festival

    Hampi (January / February)

     

    Hampi Festival is the largest festival at Hampi. Generally they are scheduled for 3 days during the first week of November. The celebrations typically packed with shows of music, dance puppet shows fireworks and a pomp procession as the grand finale showcasing the cultural richness of the place. Of late items like rock climbing, water sports and rural sports also has been included in the schedule. The programs are state sponsored and the admission is free. In local language the Hampi Festival is referred as Vijaya Utsav or Hampi Utsav.

     

    Vairamudi Festival

    Melkote (March)

     

    An important pilgrim centre Melkote in the Mandya district with several kalyanis, aesthetically and historically significant monuments housed all set to celebrate the Historical Vairamudi festival scheduled to be held on March 22.The temple town not only attracts devotees but also favorite destination for the tourists and it was estimated about one million tourists annually.

     

    Even though the pilgrim centre mainly for the SriVeershanavas, however, the tourists and devotees will not miss who visit to the Sugar district.

     

    Kambala

    (Buffalo Race), Southern Coastal Karnataka ( November - March)

     

    Kambala, or traditional buffalo racing, is a hugely popular pastime among villagers along the southern Karnataka coast. Kambala events are usually held between November and March, usually on weekends. Parallel tracks are laid out in a paddy field, along which buffaloes hurtle towards the finish line. In most cases the man rides on a board fixed to a ploughshare, literally surfing his way down the track behind the beasts.

     

     The Kambala races began almost 1000 years ago as a commemoration to the Gods for a better harvest and possibly a source of entertainment for the villagers. Today, almost 150 pairs of buffaloes and their owners take part in the 3­­­ to 4-month-long festival where different races are held over a two-day period. This includes running on a slushy 160-metre track in record time or even creating the highest slush wave.

     

    Karaga

    Bangalore (March / April)

     

     Karaga is one of the oldest and widely celebrated festivals of Karnataka. Karaga festival depicts the rich cultural and religious heritage of Karnataka. It is celebrated in honour of the Goddess Shakti. The festival is held at the famous Dharmarayaswamy temple in Bangalore. The festival starts on the full moon day of Chaitra that falls in March/April. The festival derives its name from an earthen pot in which the Goddess Shakti is invoked. The celebrations last for 9 days, starting from the full moon day.The highlight of the festival is a grand procession that is held in honour of Goddess Shakti on the full moon night.

     

     The celebration of Karaga festival in Karnataka can be traced back to over five centuries. It is believed that the festival originated in the Tigala community, a Tamil-speaking community of gardeners in Southern Karnataka. The Tigala community has been carrying forward the tradition of the festival for several centuries.

     

    Kadalekayi Parishe

    Bangalore (November)

     

    Kadalekaye Parishe, also known as Peanut festival, it is a traditional followed for more than five millennia by Kannadigas and the migrants who embraced the culture, still creates magic. The fair falls in the month of November. It is held in order to celebrate the first groundnut crop of the year. As a part of the celebrations, the farmers of the city visit the Bull temple to seek blessings of God. The more than a kilometre stretch from Ramakrishna Mutt till the Bull Temple with vendors, buyers, devotees and tourists is testimony to the fact that tradition is kept alive.

     

     The fair begins on the eve of Karthika Somawara (last Monday of Hindu month of Karthika) and is called the chikka parishe (small fair) followed by the dooda parishe (big fair) on the next two days. On every full moon day a bull would charge into the groundnut fields and damage the crop. The farmers then offered prayers to Basava Nandi to stop this and pledged to offer their first crop

     

    Huthri

    Coorg (November / December)

     

    Huthri is a traditional harvest festival of Karnataka widely known for the variety of dances and folk songs which are performed on the day of the festival. This harvest festival is celebrated in different parts of the state during the months of November-December. Huthri is celebrated by the Kodava community of Kodagu. The celebration starts of the season’s rice harvests with ceremony, music, traditional dances and much feasting for a week, beginning on a full-moon night. ‘Nerekattu’, tying of the crop, take place at the temple and the first crop would be cut after the puja. The tradition is strictly followed that the rituals would begin in homes all over Kodagu only after it began at Igguthappa temple.

     

     Banashankari Fair

    (February / March)

     

    Banashankari Fair is held as a religious cum cultural festival, at the temple precincts every year on the occasion of the Rath yatra, for a period of about three weeks starting from the Rath yatra. Pilgrims from across Karnataka and also the neighboring state of Maharashtra belonging to different religious beliefs, congregate here in large numbers to celebrate the festival.

     

     Maha Mastakabhisheka

    Shravanbelagola (Every once in 12 years, next one in 2018)

     

    Mahamasthakabhisheka, the head anointing ceremony is performed once in 12 years to the 57 feet high monolithic statue of Lord Bahubali at Shravanabelagola in Karnataka. One of the highlights of the event is the head anointing that is held for 9 days. The event is held under the leadership of His Holiness Sri Charukeerthi Bhattarakha Swamiji of Shravanabelagola. The anointing last took place in February 2006, and the next ceremony will occur in 2018

     

    Bengaluru Habba

    (December)

     

    Bangalore Habba is one of the biggest cultural festival in Bangalore. A signature festival of the state of Karnataka. The city plays host to exquisite performances from varied fields of art, dance, music, theatre and much more. The Habba will also attempt to capture the spirit of Incredible India through the Khadi and Handloom exhibitions, art and flower instillations, folk/theatre festivals and more. Rock and jazz performances, fashion shows and chamber concerts will add to the grandeur of the Habba. The 10-day long festival will bring together young artists from all over Karnataka, celebrating various art forms. The performances are slated to held across various venues in the city like Chowdiah Memorial Hall, Karnataka Chitrakala Parishath, National grounds, UB City, Seva Sadhan, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, Rangashankara, Taj Hotels etc. The Habba is a great platform to encourage young artists and give them an opportunity to showcase their talent, and share the stage with stalwarts.” The vision behind the Habba says Padmini Ravi, Trustee of Artistes' Foundation for the Arts (AFFA) that spearheads the event, has been "to provide aesthetic entertainment to a wide cultural, social and demographic cross-section of people. We wish to ensure that various art forms continue to have an impact on our culture and traditions."

     

  • CUISINE ...

    Cuisine

    Karnataka is a gracious host and offers a spread that appeals to every palate. Traditional Kannadiga cuisine is typically South Indian with a little bit of sweetness for added measure. But that doesn't begin to sum it all. The feast of the land includes Udupi, Mangalorean, Kodava and yes, Kannadiga, which again is a journey in itself - it varies with the geographical features. Even cereals vary and consumed in every imaginable and unimaginable form. To the uninitiated, some of the preparations might come across as bewildering, but no less delicious. Add to this, a highly evolved sweet tooth, and you get the deliriously wonderful concoctions, which are like nothing else in the world. With Karnataka, the pudding is the proof itself, and you see where the state gets its signature gusto from.

     

    Mangalore

    A hallelujah of seafood, spicy fish delicacies like kane fry (lady fish), rice-based preparations, and a wide variety of fruits are perennial favourites on the Mangalorean menu. Epicures believe that fresh coconut, chillies, and the Mangalorean mind together create culinary magic. Mangaloreans love rice in all forms - red grain rice, sannas (idli fluffed with toddy or yeast), pancakes, rice rottis, kori rotti (a dry, crisp, almost wafer-thin rice rotti which is served with chicken curry as a delicacy,) and neer dosa. Patrode, a special dish prepared by steaming stuffed colocasia leaves, is a delicacy not to be missed. Akki rotti, or rice rotti, is a favourite not only in Mangalore but also in Malnad and Kodagu.

     

    Malnad

    Malnad cuisine is fusion of Kodava and Mangalorean fare. Key preparations include the midigayi pickle (tender mango,) sandige, avalakki (beaten rice) and akki rotti made of rice flour.

     

    Udupi

    The ubiquitous masala dosa has its origins in Udupi, and a whole school of South Indian vegetarian cuisine takes its name from this town. This is 'pure' vegetarian food, sans onions or garlic. Pumpkins and gourds are the main ingredients, while sambar is prepared with ground coconut and coconut oil as its base. Rasam, a spicy pepper water, is an essential part of the menu, and so are jackfruit, colocasia leaves, raw green bananas, mango pickle, red chillies, and salt. Adyes (dumplings), ajadinas (dry curries) and chutneys, including one made of the skin of the ridge gourd are specialities.

     

    Kodava

    Kodava cuisine is all-out meat and gravy hedonistic and is as distinctive as their costumes, customs and festivals. Pandi curry (pork curry) and Kadumbuttu (rice dumplings) are arguably the most delectable dishes in the Kodava repertoire. The succulent koli curry (chicken curry), nool puttu (rice noodles), votti (rice rotti) and bembla curry (bamboo shoot curry) are also worth trying.

     

    North Karnataka

    The people of North Karnataka have a taste for wheat and jowar rottis (unleavened bread made of millet), a delicacy best savoured with a variety of chutnies or spicy curries. Apart from the jowar rottis and the trademark yenne badanekayi(brinjal curry), North Karnataka fare boasts a wide range of rottis to choose from: Jolada rotti, thali peet, khadak rotti and sajja rotti (bajra rotti). These rottis are accompanied by side dishes like yenne badanekayi, kaalu palya, soppu palya, usli (made from spicy sprouted gram) and jholka (made from channa dal flour). The best North Karnataka sweets are Dharwad peda, Gokak khardantu, Belgaum khunda, shenga holige and yellu holige, besides the local hoornada holige.

     

    Bijapur Biriyani

    Bijapur offers an exotic culinary treat to travellers. Most famous among them is Dosa Pandi curry with raita, korma curry or a sour dish made of brinjal. The carefully selected range of spices, which are hand ground, and the aromatic Basmati rice, give it an unforgettable flavour and fragrance.

     

    Breakfast

    As far as standard breakfast eats are concerned, you can choose from the popular uppittu (roasted semolina laced with chillies, coriander leaves, mustard and cumin seed), idli-sambar (steamed rice cake and curry), thatte idlis (flat idlis), masala dosa (pancake with curried potato filling), set dosa, rava dosa, puri palya, uthapam, vada sambar or kesari bhath (a sweet made of semolina and sugar laced with saffron) and lots more.

     

    Traditional fare

    The traditional culinary fare of Karnataka is a sumptuous spread that includes several essential menu items. These include protein-rich cereal salads like kosambri, palyas (warm vegetable salads made out of parboiled vegetables chopped fine and tossed with desiccated coconut, green chillies, curry leaves, and mustard seasoning), gojju (a vegetable cooked in tamarind juice with chilli powder in it), tovve (cooked dal without too much seasoning), huli (a thick broth of lentils and vegetables cooked together with ground coconut, spices, tamarind, and chilli powder) and pappad. A complete range of rice-based dishes, including chitranna (rice with lime juice, green chilli, turmeric powder sprinkled with fried groundnuts and coriander leaves,) vangibhath (spiced rice with eggplant,) and pulliyogare (rice flavoured with tamarind juice and spiced with groundnuts) form an integral part of the traditional repertoire. The most distinctive Karnataka dish, however, is the celebrated bisibelebhath, a unique combination of rice, dal, tamarind, chilli powder, and a dash of cinnamon. In rural areas, ragi mudde (steam-cooked finger millet rolled into large balls) served either with mutton curry or soppina saaru forms the staple diet.

     

    Desserts

    To end your meal, you may wish to indulge in sweets like chiroti (a light flaky pastry sprinkled with granulated sugar and soaked in almond milk,) Mysore pak, obbattu or holige (a flat, thin, wafer-like chappati filled with a mixture of jaggery, coconut or copra and sugar, and fried gently on a skillet) and shavige payasa (made of milk, vermicelli, sugar, and cardamom pods).

     

  • MAP ...

    • To  respect local traditions, we  suggest that  you  should avoid to wearing dresses which are short, tight fitting, sleeveless or with deep necklines. This is particularly recommended during visit to places worship and meetings with families etc.).  Visitors going to a religious place on the tour should be modestly dressed. Admission may be denied (depending on the code of conduct followed  at  the  religious  place  being  visited)  to  anyone  wearing  shorts  pants/skirts,  sleeveless t-shirts/blouses.  Bare  shoulders  and  mid-riffs  are  not  permitted  and  should  be  covered  with shawls. Visitors are required to take their shoes off and cover their heads (with scarves/ stoles) before entering a  religious  complex. Please try and avoid  very  revealing  swimsuits even at the hotel swimming pool.
  • DESTINATIONS ...

     

 

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